VOTE: Election 2020
Colorado
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November 3
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November 3
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Voting

VOTE BY MAIL

Can I vote by mail in Colorado?
Yes, you can! Voting by mail is the default in Colorado

How do I get my ballot?
Every registered Colorado voter will automatically be mailed a ballot—no need to request one.

What's the deadline to submit my ballot?
Your mail-in ballot must be received by 7:00 pm on Election day (Nov. 3)

Check Mail-In Ballot Info
EARLY VOTING

Early voting
Oct. 19

VOTING IN PERSON

Poll Times
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.

ID Requirements
Non-photo identification is required:

Driver’s license or valid ID card issued by the state
U.S. passport.
Employee ID card issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or of Colorado
Pilot’s license
U.S. military ID card
Cpy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck
Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaskan Native Blood
Medicare or Medicaid card
Copy of a U.S. birth certificate
Documentation of naturalization.
Dtudent identification card by an institute of higher education in Colorado
Veteran ID card issued by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
ID card issued by a federally recognized tribal government certifying tribal membership.


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MILITARY OR VOTING OVERSEAS

Members of the military, their families, and US citizens living overseas can request a ballot to vote from anywhere in the world.

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What's on my ballot?

The address will only be used to determine which districts you are a part of. SmartNews will not store your address or use it for any other reason.

Candidates & Races

President of the United States

Biography

Joseph Robinette "Joe" Biden, Jr. (b. November 20, 1942, in Scranton, Pennsylvania) is the former Democratic vice president of the United States, serving under President Barack Obama (D) from January 20, 2009, to January 20, 2017. He previously served as a U.S. senator from Delaware from 1973 to 2009.

On April 25, 2019, Biden announced that he was running for president of the United States in 2020. With the plurality of pledged delegates, Biden became the presumptive Democratic nominee on April 8, 2020, after Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) suspended his presidential campaign. Biden crossed the delegate threshold necessary to win the nomination on June 5, 2020, and was formally nominated at the 2020 Democratic National Convention on August 18, 2020.

Biden announced U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D) as his running mate on August 11, 2020. He called her "a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants." Harris is the first Black woman to appear on a major party's ticket in the United States.

On January 12, 2017, President Barack Obama awarded Biden the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his lifetime of public service, marking the final time Obama would present the nation's highest civilian honor. Biden received the award with distinction, an additional honor given only to Pope John Paul II, former President Ronald Reagan, and retired Gen. Colin Powell in the previous three administrations.

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Biography

Donald John Trump (b. June 14, 1946, in Queens, New York) is the 45th and current president of the United States. He assumed office on January 20, 2017. He filed to run for re-election on the same day.

Key policy initiatives during Trump's first term include the United States withdrawing from the Iran nuclear deal, the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 and First Step Act in 2018, reducing the size of the ISIS caliphate, and establishing the Space Force as an independent military branch. Trump has made more than 200 federal judicial appointments, including two U.S. Supreme Court justices.

During his presidency, Trump has issued eight vetoes. To read more about these vetoes, click here.

On December 18, 2019, Trump became the third president in U.S. history to be impeached by the U.S. House. The U.S. Senate acquitted Trump on both charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on February 5, 2020.

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Vice President of the United States

Biography

Kamala Devi Harris (b. October 20, 1964, in Oakland, California) is a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate from California. Harris was first elected to the Senate in 2016. She became the second Black woman elected to the U.S. Senate and the first Indian American to serve in the chamber.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden announced Harris was his running mate on August 11, 2020. He called her "a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants." Harris is the first Black woman to appear on a major party's ticket in the United States.

Harris previously ran for president of the United States, entering the race on January 21, 2019. She suspended her presidential campaign on December 3, 2019, and endorsed Biden on March 8, 2020.

Harris is the former attorney general of California. She served in the position from 2011 to 2017. She also served as San Francisco's district attorney from 2004 to 2011.

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Biography

Michael Richard "Mike" Pence (b. June 7, 1959, in Columbus, Indiana) is the 48th vice president of the United States, serving in President Donald Trump's (R) administration. He was elected on November 8, 2016, and sworn in on January 20, 2017.

Pence served as the 50th governor of Indiana from 2013 to 2017. As governor, Pence signed into law a 5 percent individual income tax cut in Indiana. He also supported the Indiana Religious Freedom Restoration Act in 2015, allowing individuals and businesses to exert a right to the free exercise of religion. In his first year in office, FiveThirtyEight ranked him as the second most conservative governor in the country.

From 2001 to 2013, Pence served as a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives. During his final year in the House, Pence was rated a far-right Republican leader based on an analysis of bill sponsorship by GovTrack.

Pence's press secretary stated that Pence tested negative for coronavirus on March 21, 2020. Pence was tested after one of his staffers tested positive. Click here for more information on political figures impacted by coronavirus.

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U.S. Senate Colorado

Biography

Cory Gardner (Republican Party) is a member of the U.S. Senate from Colorado. He assumed office on January 6, 2015. His current term ends on January 3, 2021.

Gardner (Republican Party) is running for re-election to the U.S. Senate to represent Colorado. He is on the ballot in the general election on November 3, 2020. He advanced from the Republican primary on June 30, 2020.

Gardner defeated incumbent Mark Udall (D) by less than 2 percentage points to win election to the seat in 2014. Gardner is up for re-election in 2020 and is one of two Republican senators up in states won by Hillary Clinton (D) in 2016.

Gardner previously served in the U.S. House, representing Colorado's 4th Congressional District from 2011 to 2015 after he defeated incumbent Betsy Markey (D) in 2010. Before that, Gardner served in the Colorado House of Representatives from 2005 to 2010.

Based on analysis of multiple outside rankings, Gardner is an average Republican member of Congress, meaning he will vote with the Republican Party on the majority of bills.

According to The Washington Post, Gardner "is...known as someone who will do more than posture when he and the Trump administration disagree" despite his "staunchly conservative voting record." For example, Gardner opposed the Trump Justice Department's move to enforce the federal prohibition on marijuana in states like Colorado that legalized the drug.

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Biography

Danny Skelly (independent) is running for election to the U.S. Senate to represent Colorado. He is a write-in candidate in the general election on November 3, 2020.

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Biography

John Hickenlooper (Democratic Party) is running for election to the U.S. Senate to represent Colorado. He is on the ballot in the general election on November 3, 2020. He advanced from the Democratic primary on June 30, 2020.

Hickenlooper also ran for election for President of the United States.

Hickenlooper (Democratic Party) was the Governor of Colorado. He assumed office on January 11, 2011. He left office on January 1, 2019.

Hickenlooper was the 42nd governor of Colorado from 2011 to 2019. He was prevented by term limits from seeking re-election in 2018.

On March 4, 2019, Hickenlooper announced that he was running for president of the United States. On August 15, 2019, Hickenlooper suspended his presidential campaign.

Hickenlooper previously served as mayor of Denver from 2003 to 2011, during which time the city hosted the 2008 Democratic National Convention.

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Biography

Raymon Doane (Libertarian Party) is running for election to the U.S. Senate to represent Colorado. He is on the ballot in the general election on November 3, 2020. He advanced from the Libertarian Party primary on June 30, 2020.

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Biography

Stephan Evans (Unity Party) (also known as Chairman SeKu) is running for election to the U.S. Senate to represent Colorado. He is on the ballot in the general election on November 3, 2020. He advanced from the Unity Party convention on April 4, 2020.

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Initiatives

Colorado Amendment 76
Citizenship Requirement for Voting Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports amending the Colorado Constitution to state that “only a citizen” of the U.S. who is 18 years of age or older can vote in Colorado.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes amending the Colorado Constitution, thus keeping the existing language that says “every citizen” of the U.S. who is 18 years of age or older can vote in Colorado.

Colorado Amendment 77
Allow Voters in Central, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek Cities to Expand Authorized Games and Increase Maximum Bets Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports allowing voters in Central, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek Cities — the only towns where gaming is legal in Colorado — to (1) approve a maximum single bet limit of any amount and (2) expand allowable game types in addition to slot machines, blackjack, poker, roulette, and craps.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes allowing voters in Central, Black Hawk, and Cripple Creek Cities to approve a maximum single bet limit of any amount, thereby retaining the current maximum single bet limit of $100, and opposes expanding allowable game types, thereby limiting games within the cities' casinos to slot machines, blackjack, poker, roulette, and craps.

Colorado Amendment B
Gallagher Amendment Repeal and Property Tax Assessment Rates Measure (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports the following: 

repealing the Gallagher Amendment, which set residential and non-residential property tax assessment rates in the state constitution;allowing the Colorado State Legislature to freeze property tax assessment rates at the current rates (7.15% for residential property and 29% for non-residential property); allowing the state legislature to provide for future property tax assessment rate decreases through state law; and continuing to require voter approval for rate increases due to TABOR.


No vote icon

A "no" vote supports maintaining the Gallagher Amendment, which requires a residential to non-residential property tax ratio of 45% to 55% and requires the state legislature to adjust the residential assessment rate to maintain the required ratio. Since 1982, the residential property tax assessment rate has dropped from 21% to 7.15% under the Gallagher Amendment.

Colorado Amendment C
Charitable Bingo and Raffles Amendment (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports amending the state constitution to lower the number of years an organization must have existed before obtaining a charitable gaming license from five years to three years and to allow charitable organizations to hire managers and operators of gaming activities so long as they are not paid more than the minimum wage.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes changing constitutional requirements for charitable gaming activities, thereby continuing to require that organizations must have existed for five years prior to obtaining a charitable gaming license and require those who operate charitable gaming activities to be unpaid volunteers of the organization.

Colorado Proposition 113
National Popular Vote Interstate Compact Referendum (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports Colorado joining the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, which would give the state’s nine electoral votes to the presidential candidate who wins the national popular vote if states representing at least 270 Electoral College votes adopt the compact.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes making Colorado part of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact (NPVIC), thereby continuing to give the state's nine electoral votes to the presidential candidate winning the most votes in Colorado.

Colorado Proposition 114
Gray Wolf Reintroduction Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports requiring the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to create a plan to reintroduce and manage gray wolves on designated lands west of the continental divide by the end of 2023.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes creating a plan to reintroduce and manage gray wolves on designated lands west of the continental divide by the end of 2023.

Colorado Proposition 115
22-Week Abortion Ban Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports prohibiting abortions in Colorado after a fetus reaches 22-weeks gestational age as calculated from the first day of the woman's last menstrual period.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes prohibiting abortions in Colorado after a fetus reaches 22-weeks gestational age, thereby maintaining current Colorado law that does not restrict abortion after a certain point in a pregnancy.

Colorado Proposition 116
Decrease Income Tax Rate from 4.63% to 4.55% Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports decreasing the state income tax rate from 4.63% to 4.55% for individuals, estates, trusts, and foreign and domestic C corporations operating in Colorado.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes decreasing the state income tax rate, thereby maintaining the current rate of 4.63% for individuals, estates, trusts, and foreign and domestic C corporations operating in Colorado.

Colorado Proposition 117
Require Voter Approval of Certain New Enterprises Exempt from TABOR Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports requiring statewide voter approval of new state enterprises if the enterprise's projected or actual revenue from fees and surcharges is greater than $100 million within its first five years.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes requiring statewide voter approval of new state enterprises.

Colorado Proposition 118
Paid Medical and Family Leave Initiative (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports establishing a paid family and medical leave program in Colorado to provide 12 weeks (up to 16 weeks in certain cases) of paid leave (with a maximum benefit of $1,100 per week) funded through a payroll tax to be paid for by employers and employees in a 50/50 split.

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes establishing a paid family and medical leave program in Colorado.

Colorado Proposition EE
Tobacco and E-Cigarette Tax Increase for Health and Education Programs Measure (2020)
Yes vote icon

A "yes" vote supports creating a tax on nicotine products such as e-cigarettes, increasing cigarette and tobacco taxes, and dedicating revenues to various health and education programs. 

No vote icon

A "no" vote opposes creating a tax on nicotine products such as e-cigarettes, increasing cigarette and tobacco taxes, and dedicating revenues to various health and education programs.